4/11/2014 - City Donates Fire Truck to Bergen County Fire Academy/Purchases New Fire Truck with Un-used $600k Grant

CITY DONATES FIRE TRUCK TO BERGEN COUNTY FIRE ACADEMY 

The city council recently agreed to use $600,000 in funds from an old, unused bond to purchase a new fire truck. With a new fire truck on order, the city donated a 1985 Mack Pumper Fire Truck to the Bergen County Law and Public Safety Institute’s Fire Academy. The pumper truck will be used to train the nearly 5,000 firefighters that attend over 280 courses at the Fire Academy each year.

“The Hackensack Fire Department recognizes the quality training that the county public safety academy provides and we are glad to contribute a piece of equipment that will help train fire fighters for years to come,” said Fire Chief Tom Freeman. 


Pictured above are: County Executive Kathleen Donovan with Hackensack Mayor John P. Labrosse, Jr, members of the Hackensack Council and administration, Fire Chief Thomas Freeman, Chief Brian Higgins Director of the Bergen County Department of Law and Safety and Peter Hodge Director of the Bergen County Law and Public Safety Institute.  

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NEWS RELEASE

CITY OF HACKENSACK
John Labrosse Mayor
City Manager 201-646-3901 April 9, 2014

 

CITY PURCHASES NEW FIRE TRUCK
COST OFFSET BY UNUSED $600,000 GRANT


(Hackensack, NJ ) The city council has agreed to purchase a new ladder truck for the Fire Department.

The cost of the $830,000 truck will be offset by $600,000 from an unused bond that was originally intended to fund a public safety training facility in Johnson Park. City Manager Anthony Rottino said he found the unspent bond money in a 2006 ordinance for the police facility as he was reviewing old financial records.

“The city has been paying interest on the bond money for nearly 8 years and has nothing to show for it. I am happy to report that we can now put that money to good use protecting the people of Hackensack,” said Rottino.

Fire Chief Tom Freeman said the new truck will replace a 24 year old truck that will be retired and a 2003 ladder truck that will become a reserve fire vehicle.

Freeman said the department has been seeking a new ladder truck since 2011 and applied for federal grants to help offset the cost of the truck, but no grants were obtained. The new truck with a reach of 105 feet -- approximately seven to eight stories – will take between 8 to 10 months to build and deliver.

To supplement its fire fighting capabilities, the city has been borrowing a 20 year-old ladder truck from the Garfield Fire Department for several years. Mayor John Labrosse said it is better for Hackensack to have its own vehicle.

“The safety of our residents and their property should not rest on the availability of a 20 year-old fire truck from another town,” said Labrosse.